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The digital plenitude : the decline of elite culture and the rise of digital media
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Title Statement
  • The digital plenitude : the decline of elite culture and the rise of digital media
Varying Form of Title
  • Decline of elite culture and the rise of new media
  • Decline of elite culture and the rise of new media
Publication, Distribution, etc. (Imprint)
  • The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts : [2019] ©2019
  • 2019
  • Språk: Engelska.
Dewey Decimal Classification Number
SAB Classification Code
Physical Description
  • xiv, 216 pages illustrations 24 cm
Bibliography, etc. Note
  • Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-207) and index.
Formatted Contents Note
  • The great divide -- Popular modernism -- Dichotomies -- Catharsis -- Flow -- Remix and originality -- Procedurality, history, and simulation -- Social media and the politics of flow.
Summary, etc
  • "There are two developments in the second half of the twentieth century have helped to define our media culture in the twenty-first. One is the rise of digital media: websites, videogames, social media, and mobile applications, as well as all the remediations of film, television, radio, and print that now appear in digital form. The other development is the end of our collective belief in what we might call Culture with a capital C. Since the middle of the twentieth century, traditional hierarchies of the visual arts, literature, and music as forms of creativity have broken down. This has been accompanied by a decline in the status of the humanities--literary studies in particular, but also history and philosophy. Jay Bolter's THE PLENITUDE is the story of how the dissolution of previously sacrosanct media institutions succumbed to the pervasive power of new forms of media. It is not an argument favoring an elite form of culture over popular culture, but rather a examination of how these changes have affected the divided societies we live in today"-- Provided by publisher.
Subject - Topical Term
ISBN
  • 9780262039734
  • 0262039737
Waiting
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*504  $aIncludes bibliographical references (pages 191-207) and index.
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How the creative abundance of today's media culture was made possible by the decline of elitism in the arts and the rise of digital media. Media culture today encompasses a universe of forms-websites, video games, blogs, books, films, television and radio programs, magazines, and more-and a multitude of practices that include making, remixing, sharing, and critiquing. This multiplicity is so vast that it cannot be comprehended as a whole. In this book, Jay David Bolter traces the roots of our media multiverse to two developments in the second half of the twentieth century- the decline of elite art and the rise of digital media. Bolter explains that we no longer have a collective belief in "Culture with a capital C." The hierarchies that ranked, for example, classical music as more important than pop, literary novels as more worthy than comic books, and television and movies as unserious have broken down. The art formerly known as high takes its place in the media plenitude. The elite culture of the twentieth century has left its mark on our current media landscape in the form of what Bolter calls "popular modernism." Meanwhile, new forms of digital media have emerged and magnified these changes, offering new platforms for communication and expression.
Bolter outlines a series of dichotomies that characterize our current media culture- catharsis and flow, the continuous rhythm of digital experience; remix (fueled by the internet's vast resources for sampling and mixing) and originality; history (not replayable) and simulation (endlessly replayable); and social media and coherent politics.

  • p. vii
  • p. xiii
  • p. 1
  • p. 27
  • p. 53
  • p. 77
  • p. 87
  • p. 99
  • p. 121
  • p. 137
  • p. 163
  • p. 187
  • p. 191
  • p. 209
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